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Whisky background

Whisky or whiskey is a type of distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash. Different grains are used for different varieties, including barley, malted barley, rye, malted rye, wheat, buckwheat and corn. Whiskey vs. Whisky: what's the difference?

Different grains are used for different varieties, including barley, malted barley, rye, malted rye, wheat, buckwheat and corn. - wikipedia

ˈwɪski/ noun
1. a spirit distilled from malted grain, especially barley or rye. "a bottle of whisky" synonyms: the water of life; usquebaugh; usque, screigh; informalscreech; informalred-eye
2. a code word representing the letter W, used in radio communication.


Whiskey vs. Whisky: what's the difference?

Same thing, just different spelling, right? No matter how you spell it, whisky/ey is an umbrella term for a type of spirit distilled from a mash of fermented grains. Within the broad category of whisky/ey are many sub-categories, including bourbon, rye, Tennessee, Scotch, Irish, and Canadian style whiskies. The manufacture of each of these types of whisky/ey is guided and regulated by the government of the spirit's country of origin. As a result, Canadian whisky, for example, is a whole different animal from Scotch whisky, Irish whiskey, and American-style whiskeys such as Tennessee, bourbon, and straight rye. (Okay, so far, so good. Maybe at this point, you’d be happy to enjoy a glass of the stuff no matter how it’s spelled. But if you've ever wondered why the word often appears different ways in different contexts, read on...)

A solution:

Up until quite recently, The New York Times tackled the problem by spelling everything the American way (with an E), regardless of the spirit’s country of origin. From Kentucky bourbon to Islay malts, everything was “whiskey” to The NYTimes. But then, last February, the venerable newspaper made a decisive change.

After receiving a raft of complaints from some serious Scotch whisky drinkers, the paper re-tooled its approach to follow that of many specialized spirits publications, spelling each type of spirit according to the way favored by its country of origin. So, while American-produced varieties such as bourbon, rye, and Tennessee - as well as the Irish stuff - kept their previous NYTimes-styled "whiskey” spelling, the stuff from Scotland, Canada, and Japan now would be referred to as “whisky.” Makes a lot of sense, I think.

American and Irish liquor producers (and copy editors) tend to favor the spelling WHISKEY, while Canadian, Scottish, and Japanese producers (and copy editors) tend to favor (or should I say, favour) WHISKY.

Whiskey/whisky nmemonics:
Here’s a quick way to remember how some of the world’s biggest producers spell their products:

Countries that have E’s in their names (UnitEd StatEs and IrEland) tend to spell it whiskEy (plural whiskeys)
Countries without E’s in their names (Canada, Scotland, and Japan) spell it whisky (plural whiskies)

Whew! Time for a drink.

- information curosty of www.thekitchn.com/whiskey-vs-whisky-whats-the-di-100476


Japanese whiskies

The model for Japanese whiskies is the single malt Scotch, although there are also examples of Japanese blended whiskies. The base is a mash of malted barley, dried in kilns fired with a little peat (although considerably less than in Scotland), and distilled using the pot still method. For some time exports of Japanese whisky suffered from the belief in the West that whisky made in the Scotch style, but not produced in Scotland, was inferior, and until fairly recently, the market for Japanese whiskies was almost entirely domestic. In recent years, Japanese whiskies have won prestigious international awards and now enjoy a reputation as a high quality product. - wikipedia

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